Four Noble Truths

The Four Noble Truths are-

  1. The Truth of suffering:
    Life has inevitable suffering.
  2. The Truth of the origin of Suffering:
    Suffering is caused by attachment and desires.
  3. The Truth of the ending Suffering:
    Suffering can be ended by overcoming attachments and desires.
  4. The Truth of the Path: 
    The Noble Eightfold Path is the way of end suffering.

A Painting of the Buddha teaching The Four Noble Truths

Explaination of the Four Noble Truths

The Four Noble Truths refer the basic concepts of Buddhism: “we want and stick to fleeting states and things, which are dukkha, unsatisfying and sorrowful.”

We are trapped in samsara due to these yearnings, the continuous cycle of resurrection, and the sorrow(dukkha) that accompanies it.

The four truths are dukkha, samudaya, nirodha, and magga, the path to cease suffering.

The way to end this cycle is the middle path. To be specific, the “end” refers to accomplishing nirvana, discontinuance of desiring, after which resurrection and related dukkha will never again emerge again.

The four truths have both symbolic and a practical applications in the Pali canon.

The four truths show up in a “System of teachings,” as a major aspect of “The whole dhamma grid,” which must be taken together.

The Eighfold Path, One of the Four Noble Truths

Importance of the four Noble Truths

The importance of the four noble truths, and their significance, evolved after some time, when prajna came to be viewed as freeing in itself, rather than the act of meditation.

The four truths became significant in the Theravada branch of Buddhism, which holds to the possibility that knowledge of the four truths is freeing in itself.

This “Liberating insight” (prajna) became importance in the sutras, and the four truths came to refer to prajna, as a component of the illumination story of the Buddha.

They are of less important in the Mahayana school in comparison with understanding of emptiness, and following the in the footsteps of the Bodhisattvas. They rendered the four truths to clarify how an enlightened being be influential in this world. They are frequently introduced in the west as one of the core teachings of Buddhism.